Padkarosda - S​ö​t​é​t V​é​gek

On their newest, heav­i­ly pan­dem­ic-de­layed LP, Budapest's Pad­karos­da don't tweak their ex­ist­ing for­mu­la too much which is just fine - no need to fix what isn't bro­ken and that one thing they do, they still ex­cell at: craft­ing moody old­school post punk sound­scapes with that raw, pitch black all-con­sum­ing death rock vibe.

Al­bum-Stream →

Catastrophic Dance Ensemble - Panko /​ Sad Machine

Al­ready hav­ing made a great first im­pres­sion with their re­cent Vol. 1 tape, Cincinnati's Cat­a­stroph­ic Dance En­sem­ble have an­oth­er tiny treat for us, rough­ly two-and-a-half new songs in their heav­i­ly egg-lean­ing odd­ball cheesy mix­ture of garage-, post- and synth punk that friends of, say… Set-Top Box, R.M.F.C., Eu­gh, Met­dog, Mononeg­a­tives, Nuts are gonna have an­oth­er field day with.

S.U.G.A.R. - II

Fol­low­ing last year's some­what un­even de­but LP of this Berlin group, their newest al­bum is a huge step for­ward in every as­pect - the huge­ly im­proved song sub­stance be­ing dri­ven forth with un­re­lent­ing mo­men­tum and cap­tured in a mid-fi aes­thet­ic that fits them per­fect­ly. Sound­wise, they're clear­ly tak­ing cues from a long lin­eage of pro­to- and old­school garage punk - ob­vi­ous­ly Stooges, MC5 and Death to be­gin with, in ad­di­tion to Dead Moon and some Wipers touch­es but, most of all, that austal­ian breed of groups like Saints, Ra­dio Bird­man, Sci­en­tists ap­pear to have left their mark in their sound, not to men­tion the larg­er-than-life fuzz punk one-hit-won­ders God - but while the lat­ter seemed to flame up and burn out over the short du­ra­tion of one glo­ri­ous A-side nev­er to reach such heights again, S.U.G.A.R. show no signs of wear yet, re­peat­ing that mar­vel eight­fold for a cer­ti­fied all-killer-no-filler al­bum.

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Flash - Flash

A marked change of pace for La Vi­da Es Un Mus Dis­cos - a la­bel usu­al­ly more con­cerned with the rougher ends of the hard- and post­core spec­trum - the de­but al­bum of this basque group has a con­tem­po­rary Lo-Fi ap­peal to its unique take on garage punk with a some­what murky and bent (or dare i say: Warttman-es­que?) sound aes­thet­ic where ei­ther gui­tars sound like synths or vice ver­sa, i wouldn't be able to tell ei­ther way. While their play­ful­ness and melod­ic­i­ty call to mind re­cent stuff by the likes of Prison Af­fair, Alien Nosejob's hard­core 45s, Be­ta Max­i­mo or Al­gara, there's al­so a raw and au­then­tic 80s hard­core un­der­cur­rent go­ing on here pep­pered with some gen­tle flash­es of Oi! and 90s emo­core.

Al­bum-Stream →

C.P.R. Doll - Music For Pleasure

De­but tape of a Perth duo fea­tur­ing folks oth­er­wise known from Ghoulies and Abort­ed Tor­toise… just as you'd ex­pect from that, this thing fuck­ing rips! A Lo-Fi DIY garage punk vibe meets some old­school melo­di­ous '77 sim­plic­i­ty, oc­ca­sion­al­ly al­so cross­ing over in­to rather con­tem­po­rary sound­ing post punk- and egg-re­lat­ed ter­ri­to­ries. This is out on Good­bye Boozy and Un­der The Gun Records but this shit would al­so fit right in with the Warttman posse so it's prob­a­bly no co­in­ci­dence that some dude al­so in­volved with Tee Vee Re­pair­man and Sa­tan­ic To­gas con­tributed some cre­ative in­put here as well.

Al­bum-Stream →

Isolation - Fabric Tear

A new EP by that Fal­mouth, UK goup con­sist­ing of most of In­ter­nal Credit's mem­bers, in­clud­ing Char­lie Mur­phy here on gui­tar and vo­cals - the dude's al­so in Freak Genes and The Red Cords. Their newest EP picks up right where the last one left off, which means that once again ex­cel­lent song­writ­ing chops col­lide with melod­ic and melan­choly, clear­ly Wipers in­flu­enced post- and garage punk which fans of Ner­vosas, The Es­tranged, Day­light Rob­bery, Ra­dioac­tiv­i­ty or Anx­ious Liv­ing should by no means miss out on.

Al­bum-Stream →

Nubot555 - No Way Back

More in­cred­i­bly bonkers shit out of the bel­gian Bel­ly But­ton Records or­bit. What we get on this dude's de­but EP un­der the Nubot555 moniker (pre­vi­ous­ly the cul­prit has been do­ing shit as King Dick) is some garage- and elec­tro punk may­hem of the over­whelm­ing­ly egg-ish va­ri­ety. These lo-fi gems man­age to coun­ter­bal­ance all their quirky weirdnes with plen­ty of smarts and cre­ative en­er­gy, mak­ing for an im­pres­sive de­but eas­i­ly stand­ing out even in its fair­ly crowd­ed genre pool. I'd say Egg Id­iot have found their match here.

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Gluer - Gluer

On their first full length ef­fort, this Stock­holm group kicks up an ex­cel­lent fuss di­vid­ed in­to snap­py to-the-point punk blasts tak­ing place some­where be­tween the poles of garage punk, hard- and post­core with cer­tain par­al­lels to acts like Ten­e­ment Rats, Sick Thoughts and ear­ly Teenanger on the more garage-lean­ing side of things as well as garage-in­fused post­core acts such as Video, Cri­sis Man, As­cot Stab­ber, Bat­piss, Flow­ers Of Evil.

Al­bum-Stream →

Freak Genes - Hologram

You can't go wrong with any new re­lease by that UK garage-/synth punk duo team­ing up Pro­to Idiot's An­drew An­der­son with Char­ly Mur­phy of groups such as The Red Cords, In­ter­nal Cred­it and Iso­la­tion. Af­ter ex­plor­ing a more cold, min­i­mal synth aes­thet­ic sound on their pre­vi­ous LP, this one presents them in a some­what fuller sound and prob­a­bly at their catchi­est so far, chan­nel­ing pri­mar­i­ly the spir­it of first-wave synth punk acts á la Prim­i­tive Cal­cu­la­tors, Ner­vous Gen­der, Scream­ers, Units, Min­i­mal Man and of course De­vo (duh!), while from the cur­rent land­scape, com­par­isons to Iso­tope Soap or Alien Nose­job in full-on elec­tro mode may be drawn as well.

Al­bum-Stream →

Coke Asian - Kegel Excess

The most un­ex­pect­ed gem of this week comes from a Paris group and ap­par­ent­ly has al­ready been record­ed in 2018. This is a puz­zling and over­whelm­ing burst of chaot­ic noise crude­ly wedged in­be­tween the edges of garage punk, KBD-style odd­i­ties and the weird­er fringes of ear­ly 80s hard­core punk. The open­er VVV evokes a vibe kin­da like a mix be­tween fel­low french­men Sub­tle Turn­hips and US hard­core odd­balls Landown­er while Moose Lodge con­jures up the lega­cy of, among oth­ers, pro­to noise rock­ers of the Flip­per, Bro­ken Tal­ent or Fun­gus Brains cal­iber. City Blocks unites the qual­i­ties of Bad Brains and MC5 in a neat lit­tle pack­age. Oth­er times, they evoke The Men­tal­ly Ill or kin­da bridge the gap be­tween Neos and Neo Neos while nu­mer­ous more re­cent groups á la To­tal Sham, Liq­uid As­sets, Launch­er, Cri­sis Man, Frea­kees or Li­po­suc­tion aren't too far off ei­ther at one point or an­oth­er. This shit is as unique as it's prim­i­tive and most­ly un­pre­dictable, more than once de­fy­ing any at­tempt at cat­e­go­riza­tion.

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