Weenog - Weenog's Tower

Okay… it looks like the cur­rent dun­geon craze, which seem­ing­ly start­ed out in the realm of synth-based sound­scapes some time ago and has since then pro­gres­sive­ly been mak­ing its pres­ence known on the fringes of garage punk, is now slow­ly but in­evitably ex­tend­ing its grip in­to the musty cel­lars of hard­core punk. This fun new tape of me­dieval sur­vival hymns about oth­er people's heads meet­ing blunt, heavy ob­jects sounds a bit as if Lumpy & The Dumpers, Cü­lo and Strange At­trac­tor joined forces to record an al­ter­nate Jab­ber­wocky sound­track.

Al­bum-Stream →

Alien Nosejob - HC45-2

This is the sec­ond hard­core 7" of muteant Jake Robertson's Alien Nose­job for Iron Lung Records, his third har­core-cen­tric re­lease over­all if i didn't miss any­thing. And of course it's yet an­oth­er de­light­ful batch of play­ful, in­ven­tive takes on the genre. What else did you ex­pect?

Al­bum-Stream →

Dollhouse - The First Day Of Spring

Dollhouse's 2019 de­mo al­ready was a thor­ough­ly re­spectable blast of for­ward-think­ing noise and even more so is their new EP that came out re­cent­ly via Tox­ic State Records, thanks to a com­par­a­tive­ly slick pro­duc­tion putting their sound em­a­nat­ing from a gray area be­tween mod­ern hard­core, post punk and post­core in just the right light, bal­anc­ing abra­sive scuzz with sheer force. The whole thing calls to mind a re­fresh­ing­ly di­verse clus­ter of groups like Mys­tic Inane, Hot Snakes, Wymyns Prysyn, Launch­er, Ce­ment Shoes or Liq­uid As­sets.

Al­bum-Stream →

Electric Chair - Social Capital

On their newest EP for Iron Lung Records, the Olympia, Wash­ing­ton group di­als down the garage fac­tor of its ear­li­er ef­forts a few notch­es with­out sac­ri­fic­ing their own dis­tinct vibe, skill­ful­ly avoid­ing the pit­falls of a dull old­school purism by break­ing with the tried-and-test­ed hard­core for­mu­las in all the right mo­ments, while still em­brac­ing their time­less po­ten­cy where it mat­ters.

Al­bum-Stream →

Nick Cage - Lost Cause

Man, this has been a lame week as far as new mu­sic is con­cerned. I don't wan­na with­hold from you one stand­out re­lease though, this lit­tle gem op­er­at­ing right in the mid­dle be­tween garage punk, hard- and post­core - kin­da like a mix be­tween Fried E/​M, Mod­ern Needs, Mys­tic Inane… with a spoon­ful of Dri­ve Like Je­hu thrown in at the right mo­ments.

Al­bum-Stream →

Exxxon - Gas Tape /​ More Gas

This group of un­clear prove­nance re­cent­ly put out their sec­ond tape - once again via Wyoming cas­sette la­bel Deluxe Bias - and just like the first one it's a mas­sive lo-fi blast of noise that sounds a bit like The Stooges and MC5 reimag­ined as a hard­core band. A certein Bad Brains dri­ve adds even more to the over­all old­school vibe and in the cur­rent scene, you might de­scribe them as a slight­ly souped-up ver­sion of Vexx… yeah, makes per­fect sense i guess. Their fuel's got 50% more X.

Nopes - Djörk

Third long­play­er by this Oak­land group and of course it's some pret­ty amaz­ing shit once again. I still find it kin­da hard to be­lieve how what start­ed out as sort of a Hüsker Dü sounda­like has de­vel­oped in­to one of the most pow­er­ful, orig­i­nal and in­stant­ly re­gog­niz­able bands of re­cent years, ef­fort­less­ly chan­nel­ing the raw en­er­gies of hard- & post­core, noise rock and garage punk in­to a row­dy, un­pre­dictable force.

Al­bum-Stream →

Foil & Silvie S - Split

Nice lit­tle split tape via Dirt­bag Dis­tro. Nev­er heard of Kansas City's Foil be­fore, but this dude's three songs on here in­stant­ly get my blood pump­ing with a quirky, raw and sham­bol­ic take on hard­core punk.
Sil­vie S on the oth­er hand is an­oth­er alias for the guy known as Bil­liam, who al­so seems to be part of Dot.com and Dis­co Junk, among oth­ers. From him, we get an­oth­er trio of fun lit­tle dit­ties in his fa­mil­iar style of min­i­mal­ist DIY garage- and synth punk.

Al­bum-Stream →

Liquids - Life Is Pain Idiot

Mat Williams' so­lo project Liq­uids has been around for a good while now and every new en­try in his by now pret­ty sub­stan­tial discog­ra­phy has been a pleas­ant, al­beit in­con­sis­tent ex­pe­ri­ence, as many of his re­leas­es felt like rather loose col­lec­tions of ma­te­r­i­al with vary­ing de­grees of qual­i­ty. That's not the case at all for Life is Pain Id­iot, his strongest col­lec­tion of songs in quite a while. With Erik Ner­vous once again work­ing his pro­duc­er mag­ic here, new stuff blends in per­fect­ly with what i con­sid­er to be the de­fin­i­tive ver­sions of songs which al­ready ap­peared in some form on one of his pre­vi­ous re­leas­es.

Al­bum-Stream →

Broken Vessels - Do You See My Smile?

Bro­ken Ves­sels are a group from San­ta Ana, Cal­i­for­nia fea­tur­ing mem­bers of Grim­ly Form­ing and Rolex (whose in­cred­i­ble de­but al­bum/­com­pi­la­tion/re-record­ing thingy i didn't post here as far as i re­mem­ber, so give that one a spin if you haven't yet). Their de­but EP sounds a lot like a some­what dumb­ed down ver­sion of Rolex, while Mys­tic Inane comes to mind as an­oth­er valid and whol­ly flat­ter­ing com­par­i­son.