Klint - Stark EP & Should Be Honey /​ Sherbet (Golden Twenties) 7"

Al­ways an oc­ca­sion of pure, un­mit­i­gat­ed joy, new songs by Schleswig, Ger­many so­lo viking synth punk war­rior Klint. The self-re­leased new Stark EP de­liv­ers six-and-a-half ex­cel­lent new blows of the equal­ly rough and noisy, weird and catchy as fuck synth punk ac­tion we all know and love. His Should be Hon­ey /​ Sher­bet 7" re­leased si­mul­ta­ne­ous­ly via ital­ian garage punk in­sti­tu­tion Good­bye Boozy then goes on a thrilling ex­per­i­men­tal side quest in­volv­ing heavy use of an­cient brass and vo­cal sam­ples pulled from 1920s swing records. This is some­thing… kin­da ran­dom, baf­fling and un­ex­pect­ed for sure. Sick shit!

Al­bum-Stream →

Ambulanz - II

An ex­cel­lent sec­ond tape by this Leipzig group dab­bling in pret­ty much ex­act­ly the catchy and play­ful kind of blend in­be­tween the worlds of garage- and post punk you've come to ex­pect com­ing out of that lo­cal scene which ain't a bad thing at all - it's all qual­i­ty shit and friends of fel­low Leipzig groups á la Exwhite, Laff Box, Lassie and Ony­on will sure­ly have a ball with this one too!

Al­bum-Stream →

Sklitakling - Sklitakling

Fol­low­ing a thor­ough­ly en­tic­ing de­but EP last year, Bergen, Nor­way group Skl­i­tak­ling present an even stronger first LP, re­tain­ing the strum­my, quirky charm of the de­but while ex­pand­ing and branch­ing out styl­is­ti­cal­ly. Their song­writ­ing has won a lot of con­tour since then, their idio­syn­crat­ic arrange­ments com­ing across much crisper now. De­spite their nor­we­gian ori­gin, i can't help but feel re­mind­ed of the dan­ish scene of the past decade - the Copen­hagen ap­proach to post punk you might say - with the likes of Iceage, Melt­ing Walk­men, Spines and, just re­cent­ly, Pleas­er com­ing to mind at var­i­ous points as hav­ing a sim­i­lar sense of melan­choly and melody. In ad­di­tion, there's a dis­tinct cow­punk vibe at play here, kin­da like an LSD-soaked ear­ly Angst, Gun Club and, es­pe­cial­ly, the more re­cent hal­lu­cino­genic ex­is­ten­tial night­mare of Mur­der­er.

Al­bum-Stream →

Sun Children Sun - Bizarre Feverre

The lat­est LP by this Tokyo group, orig­i­nal­ly re­leased last year in Japan and now be­ing reis­sued by Bal­ti­more, Mary­land la­bel SPHC Records, kicks things off with not just one, but two max­i­mal­ly corny faux-or­ches­tral in­tros seagu­ing in­to a cheesy faux-met­al pas­tiche as if hell­bent on one-up­ping any of the re­cent dun­geon punk de­vel­op­ments. Then, the ac­tu­al fun starts in the form of equal­ly ba­sic but all the same un­pre­dictable and in­ven­tive hard­core punk bursts, the afore­men­tioned tongue-in-cheek dungeon/​metal flour­ish­es be­ing coun­ter­bal­anced by a free­wheel­ing cre­ative spir­it rem­i­nis­cent of, among oth­er things, ear­ly Crass! There's no use ar­gu­ing with this kind of in­san­i­ty, just em­brace the weird and en­joy the wild ride.

Al­bum-Stream →

Soft Shoulder - It's A Small World After

(…) as fo­cused as they haven't been in a long while (…) i wrote about their pre­vi­ous al­bum Smile Building's Ex­it. Tempe, Ari­zona group Soft Shoul­der then be like: "Hold my beer…" and come around the cor­ner with yet an­oth­er LP, record­ed around the same time as its pre­de­ces­sor and pre­sent­ing their sound in an even more snap­py and com­pelling light. Their unique blend con­sist­ing of both con­tem­po­rary and an­cient post punk mag­ic tricks, old­school noise rock and dis­tinct­ly no wave- and '80s The Fall-in­formed noise ex­per­i­ments has nev­er had more catchy ap­peal and sparkle than on this record.

Al­bum-Stream →

Gremlin - 1-800-GREMLIN

Lux­u­ry new fod­der for garage- and egg­punk afic­i­na­dos by this Cin­ci­nati, Ohio group. Soft Vi­o­lence and Why Fight res­onate the quirky mad­ness of groups like Prison Af­fair, Nuts, Beer, Cher­ry Cheeks and Pringue but ex­tend that aes­thet­ic with a dis­tinct psy­che­del­ic feel trans­port­ed main­ly through the poly­phon­ic vo­cals here. The lat­ter ten­den­cies are al­so leav­ing their mark on Null Fu­ture, which ex­pert­ly treads in old­school garage punk ter­ri­to­ry re­sult­ing in a vibe á la Mononeg­a­tives with a more purist fuzz punk edge. Clos­ing track It Goes On, then, close­ly re­sem­bles the kraut-y psy­ched-out post punk vibes of fel­low Cincin­nati groups The Drin and The Serfs, sug­gest­ing some of the same folks might be at work here.

Al­bum-Stream →

Discreet Charms - Discreet Charms

Thrilling post punk shit from NYC bal­anc­ing out a clas­sic Joy Di­vi­sion-/Bauhaus/ear­ly In­ter­pol vibe with an un­ex­pect­ed­ly play­ful and melod­ic pow­er pop sen­si­bil­i­ty more rem­i­nis­cent of the likes of Woolen Men, The Es­tranged, or Radar Eyes… al­so some hints of Wipers and Tele­vi­sion can be found in there. Rather than just an­oth­er stan­dard genre pas­tiche, every­thing here is well thought-out and ro­bust­ly con­struct­ed, every track on this EP is an­chored by some sound and sol­id songcraft.

Al­bum-Stream →

TGRX - Turbo23

That's the dude from The Uglies bark­ing here, right? These aus­tralians' new EP ain't en­tire­ly dis­sim­i­lar to the lat­ter group's out­put, push­ing the whole thing in­to a more quirky, ad­ven­tur­ous di­rec­tion though, fre­quent­ly hav­ing some Use­less Eaters or Know­so feel to it in ad­di­tion to quite a bit of musty dun­geon-es­que vibes through­out the whole thing.

Al­bum-Stream →

The Abdo Men - Ulcer Anthology: Laff Your Way To Total Destruction

What­ev­er there is to be found out about this Cincin­nati, Ohio group is cloaked in a veil of un­cer­tain­ty, not helped in the least by that kin­da stereo­typ­i­cal "los­er band" his­to­ry giv­en on this cassette's band­camp page. So, prob­a­bly, there are folks known from groups like The Serfs, The Drin, Crime of Pass­ing and Mo­tor­bike at work here and at least some of the songs on this can be traced back to the year 2019, when they first ap­peared on the Pedes­tri­an Sen­ti­ments EP. Oth­er­wise i'm re­al­ly not too sure if any of the de­tails giv­en are to be be­lieved. You can't ar­gue with the mu­sic though, which kicks ass from start to fin­ish, in some way evok­ing the aes­thet­ics, vary­ing fi­deli­ty and styl­is­tic va­ri­ety of gold­en era Guid­ed By Voic­es, oth­er­wise rough­ly os­cil­lat­ing be­tween jan­g­ly pow­er pop in the vein of, say, Bed Wet­tin' Bad Boys or Bad Sports in tracks like Cow­ard Of The State, Wannabe (A Star) and Sil­ver Queen; grimy psy­che­del­ic garage rock (Didn't Win The Lot­tery, Ob­nox­ious And A Neu) as well as a cou­ple of catchy melod­ic garage punk smash­ers car­ry­ing the sig­na­ture of groups á la Boo­ji Boys, Tyvek and Par­quet Courts. It's Been A Bad Week kin­da re­sem­bles the garage-drenched noise aes­thet­ics of A Place To Bury Strangers, Peyton's Kids has sort of a Woolen Men feel to it and through­out, the folk-in­fused post punk of ear­li­er Chronophage comes to mind more than once.

Al­bum-Stream →

Cel Ray - Piss Park

Yet an­oth­er kick­ass EP by Chicago's Cel Ray, pick­ing right up where they left off on their Cel­lu­lar Ray­mond EP ear­li­er this year. I might be re­peat­ing my­self here but once again their in­ven­tive and play­ful sound kin­da strikes me as a com­bi­na­tion of some of the past decade's great­est fe­male front­ed groups á la Vexx, BB and the Blips, Neg­a­tive Scan­ner, Gen Pop or Amyl and the Snif­fers on one hand, while al­so be­ing some­what rem­i­nis­cent of that cur­rent breed of squig­gly garage-meets-post punk groups like Ura­ni­um Club, Re­al­i­ty Group, Pat­ti, Dumb or R.M.F.C..

Al­bum-Stream →