Dadar - Iron Cage

Good­bye Boozy re­leas­es tend to come in batch­es and here we have the clear stand­out of this lat­est one - the newest EP or LP or what­ev­er by Par­ma, Italy garage punks Dadar who take an­oth­er kin­da straight­for­ward, risk-averse ap­proach here styl­is­ti­cal­ly, while they once again ex­cell at en­gi­neer­ing catchy melod­ic det­o­na­tions of pure garage- and synth punk fun in the well-trod­den neigh­bor­hood of Aus­muteants, Mononeg­a­tives, Use­less Eaters and the like.

Al­bum-Stream →

Catastrophic Dance Ensemble - Panko /​ Sad Machine

Al­ready hav­ing made a great first im­pres­sion with their re­cent Vol. 1 tape, Cincinnati's Cat­a­stroph­ic Dance En­sem­ble have an­oth­er tiny treat for us, rough­ly two-and-a-half new songs in their heav­i­ly egg-lean­ing odd­ball cheesy mix­ture of garage-, post- and synth punk that friends of, say… Set-Top Box, R.M.F.C., Eu­gh, Met­dog, Mononeg­a­tives, Nuts are gonna have an­oth­er field day with.

Sick Thoughts - Heaven Is No Fun

I don't think Drew Owen aka Sick Thoughts needs an in­tro­duc­tion by now, hav­ing been a fix­ture of the garage punk scene for close to a decade now. His 2018 self-ti­tled LP al­ready count­ing as a genre clas­sic of its own, i'd say he's now cre­at­ed his de­fin­i­tive mas­ter­piece with this newest one car­ry­ing the To­tal Punk seal of qual­i­ty. Dou­bling down on the strong '77 vibes of his most re­cent Poor Boys /​ Drug Rock 7", this is an unim­peach­able set of hits and al­so his most styl­is­ti­cal­ly di­verse ef­fort so far, most no­table here be­ing oc­ca­sion­al de­tours in­to sev­en­ties hard-, glam- and sleaze rock as has been hint­ed at be­fore by the teas­er sin­gle Moth­er I Love Sa­tan - al­ready to be con­sid­ered an all-time clas­sic of taste­ful dev­il wor­ship mu­sic - and fur­ther ex­plored here in such tunes as Sub­ma­chine Love and Rich Kid.

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S.U.G.A.R. - II

Fol­low­ing last year's some­what un­even de­but LP of this Berlin group, their newest al­bum is a huge step for­ward in every as­pect - the huge­ly im­proved song sub­stance be­ing dri­ven forth with un­re­lent­ing mo­men­tum and cap­tured in a mid-fi aes­thet­ic that fits them per­fect­ly. Sound­wise, they're clear­ly tak­ing cues from a long lin­eage of pro­to- and old­school garage punk - ob­vi­ous­ly Stooges, MC5 and Death to be­gin with, in ad­di­tion to Dead Moon and some Wipers touch­es but, most of all, that austal­ian breed of groups like Saints, Ra­dio Bird­man, Sci­en­tists ap­pear to have left their mark in their sound, not to men­tion the larg­er-than-life fuzz punk one-hit-won­ders God - but while the lat­ter seemed to flame up and burn out over the short du­ra­tion of one glo­ri­ous A-side nev­er to reach such heights again, S.U.G.A.R. show no signs of wear yet, re­peat­ing that mar­vel eight­fold for a cer­ti­fied all-killer-no-filler al­bum.

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Flash - Flash

A marked change of pace for La Vi­da Es Un Mus Dis­cos - a la­bel usu­al­ly more con­cerned with the rougher ends of the hard- and post­core spec­trum - the de­but al­bum of this basque group has a con­tem­po­rary Lo-Fi ap­peal to its unique take on garage punk with a some­what murky and bent (or dare i say: Warttman-es­que?) sound aes­thet­ic where ei­ther gui­tars sound like synths or vice ver­sa, i wouldn't be able to tell ei­ther way. While their play­ful­ness and melod­ic­i­ty call to mind re­cent stuff by the likes of Prison Af­fair, Alien Nosejob's hard­core 45s, Be­ta Max­i­mo or Al­gara, there's al­so a raw and au­then­tic 80s hard­core un­der­cur­rent go­ing on here pep­pered with some gen­tle flash­es of Oi! and 90s emo­core.

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Bart and the Brats - Bart and the Brats

The sec­ond full length of these french­men is a buck­et of su­per straight­for­ward, sim­ple and catchy-as-fuck old­school garage punk joy sparkling with '77 en­er­gy - there's noth­ing too smart about if yet plen­ty to de­light in nonethe­less when these folks kick up a prim­i­tive storm com­ing across a bit like a mix of Buck Biloxi and the Fucks, The Spits, The Uglies and - quite ob­vi­ous­ly - Sick Thoughts.

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Big Screen - Demo

A cou­ple of su­per­com­bustible noise at­tacks equal parts garage- and hard­core punk in­ject­ed with tons of un­wieldy KBD en­er­gy - a new raw and prim­i­tive de­light for friends of shit rough­ly in the same or­bit as, say, Fried E/​m, To­tal Sham, Launch­er, Mod­ern Needs or Frea­kees…

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C.P.R. Doll - Music For Pleasure

De­but tape of a Perth duo fea­tur­ing folks oth­er­wise known from Ghoulies and Abort­ed Tor­toise… just as you'd ex­pect from that, this thing fuck­ing rips! A Lo-Fi DIY garage punk vibe meets some old­school melo­di­ous '77 sim­plic­i­ty, oc­ca­sion­al­ly al­so cross­ing over in­to rather con­tem­po­rary sound­ing post punk- and egg-re­lat­ed ter­ri­to­ries. This is out on Good­bye Boozy and Un­der The Gun Records but this shit would al­so fit right in with the Warttman posse so it's prob­a­bly no co­in­ci­dence that some dude al­so in­volved with Tee Vee Re­pair­man and Sa­tan­ic To­gas con­tributed some cre­ative in­put here as well.

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Clamm - Care

Clamm's fol­low-up to their al­ready strong 2020 de­but Be­seech Me is a mas­sive leap for­ward for the mel­bourne group and a stun­ning­ly con­fi­dent achieve­ment. Their garage punk dri­ven for­ward with un­re­lent­ing force is some­what rem­i­nis­cent of last-decade acts like Ex Cult and Sauna Youth or of more re­cent stuff in the vein of Flat Worms, The Cow­boy or their lo­cal con­tem­po­raries Hideous Sun De­mon. Apart from that, their songs of­ten have a slight psy­che­del­ic nudge to them not un­like De­struc­tion Unit or Hamer while, in oth­er places, there is some dark post punk un­der­cur­rent present re­mind­ing me of Con­stant Mon­grel or ear­ly Low Life.

Al­bum-Stream →

Isolation - Fabric Tear

A new EP by that Fal­mouth, UK goup con­sist­ing of most of In­ter­nal Credit's mem­bers, in­clud­ing Char­lie Mur­phy here on gui­tar and vo­cals - the dude's al­so in Freak Genes and The Red Cords. Their newest EP picks up right where the last one left off, which means that once again ex­cel­lent song­writ­ing chops col­lide with melod­ic and melan­choly, clear­ly Wipers in­flu­enced post- and garage punk which fans of Ner­vosas, The Es­tranged, Day­light Rob­bery, Ra­dioac­tiv­i­ty or Anx­ious Liv­ing should by no means miss out on.

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