Chubby & The Gang - Speed Kills

Chubby & The Gang - Speed Kills

No rocket sci­ence on Chubby & The Gang's debut album, just the plain old melo­dic punk rock schtick. But boy, is that some really fuck­ing good stuff. '77 catchy­ness is injec­ted with loads of hard­core energy and given a rough garage sur­face. Kinda like Booji Boys recor­ded in high fide­lity.

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Maximum Roach - Dry Rot

Maximum Roach - Dry Rot

This group, pro­bably from Phoe­nix, Ari­zona, sets up some che­mi­cally unsta­ble noise punk shit wel­ded to a gara­ge­core rocket drive ready to blow up in your face. At times you might feel plea­s­antly remin­ded of acts like Beast Fiend, Anxiety, Bo Gritz or Mys­tic Inane.

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Punter - Demo

Punter - Demo

Ano­t­her batch of awe­some garage punk with an occa­sio­nal hard­core edge from the ever reli­able mel­bourne scene. At times, Punter's music has a fran­tic qua­lity remi­nis­cent of Jack­son Reid Briggs & The Hea­ters, com­bi­ned with the slightly more groun­ded garage sound of Civic or ear­lier Vaguess, with the latter's pop instincts as well as some Pist Idi­ots-style drama boi­ling over at the EP's most anthe­mic moment, A Minute's Silence.

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Alien Nosejob - Suddenly Everything Is Twice As Loud

Alien Nosejob - Suddenly Everything Is Twice As Loud

I'm not sure if Alien Nose­job cur­r­ently exist as a full blown band, but at least for their second long play­ing effort, Jake Robert­son (Aus­mu­te­ants, School Damage, Lea­ther Towel, Hiero­phants, etc.) has been record­ing ever­ything on his own. While the last few releases tur­ned out to be a rather wild and unpre­dic­ta­ble ride - tou­ch­ing on Power-/Jan­gele Pop, Synth Pop and Hard­core Punk among other things - Alien Nosejob's newest album is an unex­pec­tedly con­sis­tent work mostly ope­ra­ting in a spec­trum of sad power pop and more fami­liar Aus­mu­te­ants style garage fare, wrap­ped in a warm and fuzzy ana­log aes­the­tic vary­ing from mid- to high fide­lity. Wit­hout excep­tion, these songs are top rate stuff, just clas­sic Robert­son at his best.

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Trashdog - Dipshitticus

Trashdog - Dipshitticus

What a beau­ti­fully der­an­ged kind of mess, the second Album by Trash­dog a.k.a. Andrew Jack­son, the dude also respon­si­ble for Aus­tin, Texas label Digi­tal Hot­dogs. I didn't expect a lot of nor­malcy here to begin with, but none­theless i'm kind of asto­nis­hed by the mas­sive amount of top notch good­ness scat­te­red wildly across this record, espe­ci­ally after i found Trashdog's first effort to be of some­what incon­sis­tent qua­lity. Roughly one third here con­sists of dumb jokes and various shades of fuck­ing around. Ano­t­her third turns out to be bril­li­antly weird and inven­tive song­craft in a spec­trum of garage punk, power pop, synth-/elec­tro punk and a tiny hint of glam. And as for the remai­ning third, i'm some­what unde­ci­ded in which of the first two cate­go­ries i should file that stuff. The whole of it makes for an awe­some, if at times over­whel­ming, dis­ori­en­ting rol­ler coas­ter ride. Some kind of white album on stu­pid pills.

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Moist Boy - Deep Rest

Moist Boy - Deep Rest

Moist Boy from New Bed­ford, Mas­sa­chu­setts are one of the rare cases in which a band comes some­what close to what you could call pop punk wit­hout imme­dia­tely pis­sing me off. But for me, that's having most to do with incredi­bly low stan­dards in that par­ti­cu­lar genre rather than an aver­sion to simple, strai­ght­for­ward melo­dies. Pop punk bands just tend to fuck up even the most basic, fun­da­men­tal com­pon­ents of decent punk rock.
Moist Boy don't suck in the sligh­test and that's thanks to first rate song­wri­ting abi­li­ties, an ade­qua­tely tight and pun­chy per­for­mance and - to coun­ter the sweet catchy­ness of their melo­dies - a dis­tinct garage edge as well as some rather dark lyri­cal con­tent. Qua­lity stuff throughout and requi­red lis­ten­ing if you appre­ciate bands like Cheap Whine, Dark Thoughts, Steve Ada­myk Band… maybe even The Mar­ked Men!

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The Resource Network & Big Hog - Split 7"

The Resource Network & Big Hog - Split 7"
The Resource Network & Big Hog - Split 7"

This already marks the second time these two bands from India­na­po­lis are poo­ling their, um… resour­ces for a split release - this time it's a 7" on Good­bye Boozy Records. Not only is the record­ing qua­lity a little bit less rough than last time; both bands have also signi­fi­cantly diver­si­fied their musi­cal voca­bu­lary.
The Resource Net­work alter­nate bet­ween smar­typ­ants garage punk of the Ura­nium Club & Yam­me­rer variety, a post punk/-core thingy you could ima­gine as a weird mix of Rites Of Spring and early Slo­venly, and finally a strai­ght punk rocker radia­ting a Laun­cher-style KBD Vibe.
Quite a bit of the lat­ter you can also find on Big Hog's side and there's less of a hard­core edge to their new songs - ins­tead you'll find a wild post punk ride you might describe as Patti-meet-early-Minu­te­men, sur­roun­ded by two blasts of noise punk resemb­ling what Lumpy & The Dum­pers could have sounded like on some sort of sludge/​doom trip.

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Warm Exit - Demo

Warm Exit - Demo

On their demo, Brussels out­fit Warm Exit come up with a flaw­less little dose of synth-enhan­ced garage punk, alter­na­tely remin­ding me of con­tem­porary genre power­houses like Aus­mu­te­ants, Dumb, Erik Ner­vous or Power­plant.

Super X - Super X

Super X - Super X

This tape by Mel­bourne group Super-X isn't exac­tly new stuff, but that shit is way to strong not to be men­tio­ned here. Wit­ness a sonic spec­ta­cle unfold, fusing the old garage-/proto punk fuzz of Fun House-era Stoo­ges with spa­ced out vibes not unlike Dest­ruc­tion Unit or early Tele­scopes, all the while drag­ging along with it some traces of con­tem­porary post punk.

Acid & Eltern - Demo

Acid & Eltern - Demo

In recent years, Colo­gne has deve­lo­ped quite an impres­sive track record of folks put­ting on DIY garage shows, thus i always won­de­red why i didn't get to hear much in terms of local bands, even less in terms of recor­ded mate­rial. Howe­ver… Acid & Eltern are indeed a band from Colo­gne and their first demo makes for a tho­roughly plea­sing lis­ten. Recor­ded in raw and fuzzy mono, I'd locate their sound - among others - roughly in the realm of Ex-Cult, Useless Eaters and the muddy LoFi-Aes­the­tics of early Erik Ner­vous.

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