Signal - Love w/​o Moisture

On their sec­ond EP, New York punks Sig­nal brew up a strong po­tion con­sist­ing of raw noise-/fuzz punk and post punk/-core. To me it sounds a bit like an amal­ga­ma­tion of ear­li­er Lié and Lit­tly Ug­ly girls, but al­so con­tains quite some of the rough, garagey vibes sim­i­lar to Warp or Vexxx.

Al­bum-Stream →

Gunky - Ectoplastic

This de­but EP by Philadel­phia band Gunky is kind of an odd and de­li­ciois bas­tard of (post-)punk and noise, bold­ly plun­der­ing its way through large por­tions of un­der­ground punk his­to­ry. I think i hear some echoes of MX-80 and mid-eight­ies Son­ic Youth, The Men­tal­ly Ill and of ear­ly Sac­cha­rine Trust's pro­to post­core. In oth­er mo­ments, their sound re­minds me of more re­cent bands, the likes of like Pat­ti or Plax.

Al­bum-Stream →

Krul - EP

The aus­tralian Scene al­ways finds new ways to sur­prise, some­times out­right baf­fle me. This time it's done by a mel­bourne group fea­tur­ing mem­bers of, among oth­ers, Kids Of Zoo, pro­found­ly un­set­tling my sense of ge­og­ra­phy by way of hav­ing their lyrics sung in japan­ese. Sound-wise, i'm re­mind­ed of more-or-less gloomy post punk stuff by acts like In­sti­tute, Diät, Crim­i­nal Code, Pret­ty Hurts or Acrylics - com­bined with some noisy and rough DIY punk in the vein of Lumpy & The Dumpers, Launch­er or Beast Fiend, as well as a faint echo of Hot Snakes.

Al­bum-Stream →

Isolation - Isolation

Ba­si­cal­ly, this Fal­mouth, UK band's line up con­sists of lo­cal punks In­ter­nal Cred­it mi­nus one dude. Com­pared to the latter's rather straight­for­ward garage punk, Iso­la­tion roll out a some­what more rigid sound on their de­but EP, ex­pand­ing their sol­id garage foun­da­tion by a cer­tain post­core edge, bring­ing to mind Hot Snakes or Youth Avoiders, as well as melod­ic post punk acts like Red Dons, Day­light Rob­bery, Anx­ious Liv­ing, Ner­vosas and maybe some tiny traces of Wipers. What's not to like about that?

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Goon - Natural Evil

Here's an ul­tra neat at­tack made of noise-drenched hard-/post­core by a band from Den­ver, Col­orado. Think of a cu­ri­ous mix­ture of Lumpy & The Dumpers, Anx­i­ety, Cü­lo or their qua­si-suc­ces­sors Taran­tüla.

Al­bum-Stream →

Luggage - Shift

With their third Al­bum, Chicago's Lug­gage de­liv­er a seam­less con­tin­u­a­tion of the qual­i­ties es­tab­lished on their 2017 ef­fort Three, even dou­ble down on those. Fit­ting­ly and un­mis­tak­ably record­ed at Elec­tri­cal Au­dio, a brit­tle, of­ten crawl­ing sound in the rough area of Noise- and Math Rock, Post- and Slow­core al­lows it­self am­ple time to un­fold and sounds a lot like their home­town in the late 80s to 90s. Or, at dif­fer­ent points, like a more straight­for­ward Shel­lac, slow mo­tion Tar, much loud­er Slint or an even more bleak vari­ant of Codeine.

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Acrylics - Sinking In

Af­ter a num­ber of in­cred­i­ble EPs, it took San­ta Rosa's Acrylics a good two years to as­sem­ble their fist long play­er, which - to no re­al sur­prise - turns out to be their most var­ied and ma­ture chunk of noise. Their am­bi­tious, but si­mul­ta­ne­ous­ly al­ways per­fect­ly co­her­ent mix of styles draws a per­fect tri­an­gle be­tween the dark post punk of Crim­i­nal Code, hard­core punk of the quite pun­ish­ing va­ri­ety rem­i­nis­cent of Cü­lo, Hate Preach­ers, Im­pul­so and for­ward think­ing Post­core of acts like Ivy and Bad Breed­ing.

Al­bum-Stream →

Kumusta - Kumusta #1

Ex­quis­ite shit from Rouen, France. Ku­mus­ta emerge on the scene with a fun mix­ture draw­ing a line from noise rock & -core on one end of the spec­trum, some raw garage en­er­gy on the oth­er, a shit­load of post punk & post­core in be­tween. Imag­ine a fu­sion of slowed-down Bad Breed­ing with Crim­i­nal Code in cer­tain mo­ments, or at oth­er times, you might be re­mind­ed of Australia's post­core pow­er­tools Bat­piss and Bench Press.

Al­bum-Stream →

Lux - New Day

Barcelona's Lux al­ready have a de­mo and a promis­ing de­but al­bum un­der their belt, but with this re­cent EP their sound re­al­ly clicks in­to gear, in which some of the more ex­cen­tric strands of 80s post- and hard­core punk - Man Sized Ac­tion and The Pro­le­tari­at come to mind - col­lide with dis­tinc­tive goth/​deathpunk bass lines. You might al­so be re­mind­ed of more re­cend bands like Street Eaters or the po­tent cow­punk propul­sion of Mur­der­er.

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Austerity - Anarcho Punk Dance Party

What the ti­tle promis­es, this record de­liv­ers. Dance­able shit? You bet! An­ar­chist mes­sages? Tons of those get pro­claimed here in such den­si­ty you re­al­ly can't miss or ig­nore them. Mu­si­cal­ly, this is not ex­act­ly some­thing you'd as­so­ciate with an­ar­cho punk, al­though this stuff clear­ly has much of the same spir­it. This is in­fec­touis post punk with a punchy post­core edge which, de­spite its dance­floor ef­fec­tive­ness, al­so suc­ceeds in the noise de­part­ment, show­ing no fear of wak­ing up the neigh­bors. This, and their ex­plic­it­ly po­lit­i­cal lyrics seper­ate them quite a bit from last decade's short-lived dance punk ex­plo­sion. In­stead of New York cool you get an ap­pro­pri­ate­ly blunt and dis­tinct­ly british sense of ur­gency, even as they seem to share many of the same in­flu­ences. Gang Of Four, ob­vi­ous­ly, as well as Min­ute­men, mid- to late eight­ies Mem­branes, The Pop Group. And in the present, com­par­ing them to Tics, Pill, Slumb Par­ty, Spe­cial In­ter­est or UZS wouldn't be too far off.

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